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Equal Pay for Equal Work Act Face Growing Pains

Equal Pay for Equal Work Act Face Growing Pains
Equal Pay for Equal Work Act requires pay transparency. This includes pay or pay range in job postings, which is one of several requirements that is mandated by Colorado's Equal Pay for Equal Work Act (Equal Pay). This took effect last January and was passed in 2019.
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Equal Pay for Equal Work Act requires pay transparency. This includes pay or pay range in job postings, which is one of several requirements that is mandated by Colorado’s Equal Pay for Equal Work Act (Equal Pay). This took effect last January and was passed in 2019.

Equal Pay for Equal Work Act – Variety of Mandates

The law does include many other mandates which are aimed at closing the gender pay gap. It is to even the playing field among workers. What is notable is to require employers to notify employees of promotion opportunities. Also, keep records of all employees’ job descriptions. Plus pay histories during employment. It was for two years after. It does prohibit the employers from asking about a job applicant’s pay history.

However, over the last year, the law has faced it share of growing pains. This is according to Scott Moss. He is the director of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment’s (CDLE) Division of Labor Standards and Statistics. That enforces aspects of the law.

Enforce of the Law

Even before the law did take effect, the struggles began. Rocky Mountain Association of Recruiters (RMAR), in December 2020, had filed a lawsuit against Moss. This was to challenge is division’s rules. Thus it would interpret the law for enforcement. “In fact, it did start out as a lawsuit about the rules. However, it did become clear, including in the association’s court filing, it was, in fact, challenge to the act itself,” Moss says. It was by early July, that is when news of companies did side step the law which had received national attention, then RMAR dropped the suit.

It is clear that not all companies are fans of the pay transparency requirement, this part of the law was at least better understood than other components during the first year.

“Actually, I don’t want to post a position that is not actually available,” says Marisa Daspit. She is the chief people officer at Ibotta. It is a Colorado-based company that provides cashback to shoppers.

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